FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Debunking Myths

This is the most popular myth of all time. Many home-based experiments agree on this myth. However, there are conditions to look deeper into this matter: how quickly it attracts ants varies from the moisture content of the honey, humidity of the environment, and location.

 

Honey with high moisture content (not so sticky) has more air and scent molecules that are released through evaporation and thus it is easier to attract ants.

 

When the environment has high humidity, it is easier for insects to pick up scents. Honey stored in humid places are prone to attracting ants.

 

It is a common issue for some bee keepers facing ants infestation in their hives. The hives are being checked regularly to avoid these honey thieves stealing from the hive!

 

Hence, if your honey is crawling with ants, honey, it is safe.

Here comes the science part: any super saturated solution of sucrose and glucose attracts molecules that support the process of forming crystals.

 

There are conditions that affects the crystalization of honey. One factor that affects the crystalization of honey is the fructose-glucose ratio. The higher the fructose in honey, the less likely it is for the honey to harden. While honey with high glucose content will experience the opposite.

 

Temperature also plays a part in crytalizing honey. Honey placed in a cool location will experience crystalization.

There are many mythical honey test methods being shared in the free flow internet. Anyone can share their findings on the internet, with or without scientific research publications.

 

The truth is, the only thing being tested is honey’s moisture content, with a refractometer.

 

Other than that, the only way to properly test the quality of honey is through labotary tests. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) test is one of the method to test added sugar in honey.

It is a myth. Yet, it is all over the internet, however, there is no scientific evidence supporting this test. The reasonable explanation from our little science knowledge is: the swirling of water and honey, together with the viscosity of the honey, and some water surface tension draws up the pattern. And perhaps with the psychology motivated perception, leading viewers to “we see what we want to see“.

 

Now, what if honey does have “genetic memory“? That will be a major breakthrough for our technology, imagine mankind able to mimic nature’s creation in molecular level, broken vase repairs itself, blunt kitchen knife sharpens itself, isn’t that great? Tony Stark made it with his Iron Man suit!

Honey Storage

Storage at room temperature is the best way as refrigeration is not necessary. However, if you prefer thicker or creamier honey, storing in fridge is your best choice. Most raw honey crystallize over time, lower temperature speeds up the crystallization process.

Storage at room temperature is the best way as refrigeration is not necessary. However, if you prefer thicker or creamier honey, storing in fridge is your best choice. Most raw honey crystallize over time, lower temperature speeds up the crystallization process.